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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I can't seem to find another thread to answer my question, so ...

Has anyone installed an aftermarket rear sway bar? I'm replacing the stock springs with those from Corksport to drop it just shy of 2 inches, but am considering adding this as well:

https://www.hardracesuspension.com.au/add-on-rear-sway-bar-for-mazda-cx-3-dk-2015.html

For handling. From my reading, there seems to mention understeer. Not something I'm familiar with coming from an BMW E46 M3.

Any thoughts I should consider?
 

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From my experience dropping the rear suspension and attempting to install a lift kit I found that the rear suspension is going to be the least flexing component of the entire vehicle. Infact as you will see when installing corksport spring (look at their pdf for installation and youll see removal process of stock springs) you will need to raise the entire rear end to be able to drop/angle the torsion bar downwards. It simply will not give any play to just one side. Now this could probably be reinforced even further with a aftermarket sway bar but from my prespective and past aggrivation of working with the rear end, its not going to make much of a difference especially since this car is not pushing 400+ to the wheel or doing drift runs haha. The rear suspension is basically a built in sway bar for the back.
 

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The rear suspension in our cars is a torsion beam.

Before you make any changes, read up on what that means with respect to changes.
AutoSpeed - Anti-Roll Bars and Torsion Beam Rear Suspensions, Part 1
http://www.autospeed.com/cms/A_113302/article.html

Once you better understand that, determine what exactly you mean by "for handling". Do you want the car to rotate easier on an autocross course? Or do you just want a stiffer-feeling ride?

All other things being equal, more roll stiffness at one end of the car makes that end of the car lose traction earlier than less roll stiffness.

Edit: Ugh, I just read the marketing crap on that link you posted. Swaybars aren't about making the car corner flat. You can do that with just springs. Swaybars are about fine tuning forces during cornering.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so you're saying the lowering springs will be enough to limit the roll of the car. Does that sound about right?
I had read (not experienced) that the car has a bit of understeer, and from my limited understanding, the solution for understeer is to reinforce the rear sway bar. (where the solution for over steer would be to reinforce the front swaybar).
If the springs are enough, I may as well just save the $345 and shipping from australia
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The rear suspension in our cars is a torsion beam.

Before you make any changes, read up on what that means with respect to changes.
AutoSpeed - Anti-Roll Bars and Torsion Beam Rear Suspensions, Part 1
AutoSpeed - Anti-Roll Bars and Torsion Beam Rear Suspensions, Part 2

Once you better understand that, determine what exactly you mean by "for handling". Do you want the car to rotate easier on an autocross course? Or do you just want a stiffer-feeling ride?

All other things being equal, more roll stiffness at one end of the car makes that end of the car lose traction earlier than less roll stiffness.

Edit: Ugh, I just read the marketing crap on that link you posted. Swaybars aren't about making the car corner flat. You can do that with just springs. Swaybars are about fine tuning forces during cornering.
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well what I meant by handling was what I meant earlier, the rear sway-bar would be to limit the understeer inherant to our cars. At least that would be my intent. But I see your point about fine tuning the forces. So that's a useful comment along with the other one. I think I'm going to just save on the swaybar for now.

Thanks so much!
 
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