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Discussion Starter #1
Installed the finally released K&N air filter in my CX3 this past week. I've always had good success with these filters in previous cars. Typically notice better, crisper throttle response, and modest increase in mileage. So far, I'm noticing the same gains. Mid-range seems a bit stronger as well. I've picked up 2/10 of a mile per gallon so far. I also like the fact that they are washable/re-usable.
 

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I've tried them in the past but couldn't get on with the sound of an F16 jet following me around ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As above, the following is the part #. Fits great. Takes about 2 whole minutes to swap out.

33-5042
Replacement Air Filter
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I ordered one too and it should be delivered this weekend. :)

Any tips to swap the filter without doing the pipe ring clamp? Thanks!
There is enough slack/flex that you don't need to do anything more than pop the tabs for the cover on the filter box then slip the new filter in.
 

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I've never been a fan of K&N air filters. In order to let more air through you have reduce the restrictions. You can either increase the surface area (more pores) or increase the pore size. Since there's a finite amount of space to pack more pleats, they have to increase pore size. This lets more dirt through.

Also, the washable lifetime filters are more prone to user error. Oil them too much when cleaning and you can end up fouling the MAF.

K&N Air Filter Review - Debunking the Myths (and why OEM is better)

Air Filtration Test
 

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I've never been a fan of K&N air filters. In order to let more air through you have reduce the restrictions. You can either increase the surface area (more pores) or increase the pore size. Since there's a finite amount of space to pack more pleats, they have to increase pore size. This lets more dirt through.

Also, the washable lifetime filters are more prone to user error. Oil them too much when cleaning and you can end up fouling the MAF.

K&N Air Filter Review - Debunking the Myths (and why OEM is better)

Air Filtration Test
Marketing is a powerful thing. I've heard so many people say "K&N filters are supposed to be the best" but have no idea where that information came from, and have seen zero evidence to substantiate that claim. Most of the time they aren't even sure what they are supposed to be "the best" at.

I've seen many tests like the ones you posted, and they all prove the same thing over and over again. K&N filters (not picking on K&N specifically... other filters of that type too) do not filter as well as standard OEM filters, which means more particulates in your engine.

It is true that airflow can be marginally better with these filters, but I think the majority of the public fails to understand that this is completely irrelevant in the real world. Yes the POTENTIAL is there for greater airflow, but the engine is already getting all the air it needs, so there is nothing to be gained. If your OEM filter prevented the engine from receiving the proper amount of air, then sure, a less restrictive filter would help and may even produce more horsepower. But that simply isn't the case. Can you really believe that an engine manufacturer would design an intake system and not bother to work out how much airflow the engine required? The fact is, the intake system of any car is designed to deliver as much air as the engine needs, with plenty of buffer to allow for dirty filters, bugs, etc. The engine pulls in only what it needs, so putting on a less restrictive filter will not cause the engine to suddenly use more air, and thus it is simply not possible to increase horsepower that way.

How about this: If you replace your typical 1/4" fuel lines with a garden hose, you'll get more horsepower... more gas = more horsepower right? Well, no. The engine is already using all the fuel it needs, so increasing the POTENTIAL to deliver more fuel is pointless.

It boils down to this: standard OEM type air filters filter better and will keep your engine cleaner than a K&N, plus they are perfectly capable of supplying all the airflow your car needs. K&N filters allow more particulates to enter your engine, they commonly cause problems with oil deposits on MAF sensors, and do nothing to increase power. To me it's a no-brainer.
 

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I don't want to enter this debate to argue against these filters but I much prefer the standard factory filter for all of the above reasons and the fact that I don't want to hear intake noise as it detracts from the enjoyment of running a modern refined and well engineered car.
 

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An old post but my two cents. I have used K&N filters for YEARS in bikes and cars without a problem. If you choose not to use one, fine, each to his own. As for me I will use them and enjoy them... As to oil on the MAF sensor this has indeed happened, it is called over oiling DOH. Follow the directions for cleaning and oiling and all will be OK. MORE oil is not better LOL

I ordered a K&N for my wife's CX-3 and will install it as soon as it arrives (oem filter is finally ready to be replaced at 18K).
 

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Here's the word from one race team on why they run Mazda OEM paper filters for the rotary race cars (even the 3-rotor cars) rather than K&N filters:

https://www.rx8club.com/series-i-tech-garage-22/k-n-air-filter-177971/#post3849277

Eric Meyer said:
Now here is the logic: Several years ago we were blowing up engines right and left. Left and right. backwards forwards, etc. I started asking around to get some help and ended up talking with David Haskill of SpeedSource. If you've not heard the SpeedSource name before they are the Professional Road Race team running building and running the majority of 3 rotor Rolex cars in the Grand-Am Series. They built the Dempsey cars. They built the Racers Edge cars. They build the Sahlens cars....

They also built the original Renesis cars (like ours) from 2004 until a few years ago. Some of these cars are still floating around. Some have been trashed/wrecked or converted to something else.

SpeedSource has been a factory supproted Mazda team for several years now. David Haskill is the team engineer. David is also a driver. Smart guy. Super nice guy. Very busy guy.

So I contact him and share our issue. One of the first things he asks me is this: "what kind of air filter are you running?". No kidding. Did you know that their 3 rotor engines run THE STOCK RX8 PAPER FILTER? Yep.

We ran a K&N style for a few races just because I thought this technology was the best. It made about 1 more hp on the dyno than paper. So we ran it. We also toasted two motors at Daytona and one at Homestead running the Grand-Am Koni Challenge Series. When we pulled these motors apart we found (drum roll) sand blasted rotor housings where the air would enter the intake ports. Switched over to paper, ran both these tracks again and the witness marks were gone. Problem fixed. David also confirmed that he had saw this before also.

That is the basis of why I beleive paper is a better filtration media. We run the Mazda/AEM cannister style filter that comes with the long AEM/Mazda intake. We also found this intake to make the most torque.

Cheers,

Eric
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Eric Meyer
XOWii Racing
World Challenge TC #32
Mazda RX8
Indianapolis, IN
Face Book XOWii Racing
 

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I never knew that changing air filters is kinda a big of a deal for some. This is new for me. Why should you change air filter? Has it something to do only with the sound?
Just curious because i never heard of this.
 

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Eventually your OEM air filter get to the point of needing replacement. I usually clean mine once, then the 2nd time it is harder to get the grit out of it, so it is replaced. K&N filters use a cotton media with oil that is designed to be cleaned and works well. Sure it takes a few minutes to clean it rather than just slap in a new paper filter but no big deal for me.

Some vehicles (and aftermarket) use a foam air filter with oil but these tend to deteriorate with time and the foam breaks down. Motorcycles use these a lot.

The important thing is to run a clean filter (no matter who makes it).
 

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We should clarify that changing your air filter is part of normal periodic maintenance. For the most part, high-quality paper filters are all going to be roughly the same.

Changing it for something other than the style the manufacturer recommends is completely different.

For most people choosing the K&N, it's one or more of these:
* marketing brainwashing
* sound
* perceived performance improvement
* re-usability
 
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