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Discussion Starter #1
Well.....I hate to say it, but claims of a class 1, 1/14 hitch being able to carry bikes on the CX-3 seem to be exaggerated from my very recent experience.

I've been a mountain biker for a long.....LONG time, so carrying bikes on a hitch rack is far from a new experience for me.

The story goes as such.

Do my research and decide on the Curt Branded Class 1, 1 1/4" hitch.

Get said hitch installed, and mount a brand spanking new Thule T2 XT Pro, rated by Thule as being class 1 compliant.

1 bike wasn't so bad, but 2 carbon mountain bikes made the system flex to a point that made me nauseous. I honestly wouldn't have made the 10km/60 kmph trip again if you paid me.

A healthy mix of bike geeks that span everything from guys who used to work at hitch stores, to a mechanical engineer all agreed the setup was far from optimal.

Long Story Short - Buyer Beware as far as I'm concerned when it comes to tray style bike racks on the CX-3. 2 30lb bikes, plus 42lb tray style rack, plus the distance from the end of the receiver to the end of the rack all add up to potential bad times.

I'm having the hitch removed and refunded on the weekend and new roof racks are being delivered tomorrow afternoon hopefully.

Video of Flex - https://youtu.be/vyqIb4nbFMQ

Cheers,

~TG
 

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Yeah, I would not be too pleased with that amount of flexing either. Does not look too sturdy at all.

I'm using the Yakima king joe 2 hatch-mounted rack I had when I owned an MDX.

So far, so good.
 

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Well.....I hate to say it, but claims of a class 1, 1/14 hitch being able to carry bikes on the CX-3 seem to be exaggerated from my very recent experience.

I've been a mountain biker for a long.....LONG time, so carrying bikes on a hitch rack is far from a new experience for me.

The story goes as such.

Do my research and decide on the Curt Branded Class 1, 1 1/4" hitch.

Get said hitch installed, and mount a brand spanking new Thule T2 XT Pro, rated by Thule as being class 1 compliant.

1 bike wasn't so bad, but 2 carbon mountain bikes made the system flex to a point that made me nauseous. I honestly wouldn't have made the 10km/60 kmph trip again if you paid me.

A healthy mix of bike geeks that span everything from guys who used to work at hitch stores, to a mechanical engineer all agreed the setup was far from optimal.

Long Story Short - Buyer Beware as far as I'm concerned when it comes to tray style bike racks on the CX-3. 2 30lb bikes, plus 42lb tray style rack, plus the distance from the end of the receiver to the end of the rack all add up to potential bad times.

I'm having the hitch removed and refunded on the weekend and new roof racks are being delivered tomorrow afternoon hopefully.

Video of Flex - https://youtu.be/vyqIb4nbFMQ

Cheers,

~TG
Kurt hitches recommend you have a strap from the bike rack to the vehicle to eliminate some flex.
 

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I might add I don't have a curt but I do not get anything close to the flex you are getting with two bikes on my rack.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I might add I don't have a curt but I do not get anything close to the flex you are getting with two bikes on my rack.

Indeed they do, and for some reason Drawtite does not. That being said, I don't honestly believe by looking at the schematics of the drawtite model 24933 that it honestly would be any better. I think the issue here is where Mazda's mounting points are on the CX-3. The Curt (11418) and the Drawtite attach at the same spots. Long story short, after the terrifying drive to the trailhead last night, I'll be happy to throw my toys on the roof. Added bonus is I now have a functioning back up camera ;)

~TG
 

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I literally took a new CX-3 out for a test drive yesterday after checking to see if my mtb fit in the back with the front wheel off. I also have a Thule T2 XT Pro which I intended to use to transport my carbon mtb's. I also have a heavier fatbike which now concerns me. Anyone try the Hidden Hitch or Drawtite? I'd hate to pass on a CX-3 based on this but it's a HUGE deciding factor. I just purchased the Thule for a number of reasons and don't want to use anything else.
 

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I literally took a new CX-3 out for a test drive yesterday after checking to see if my mtb fit in the back with the front wheel off. I also have a Thule T2 XT Pro which I intended to use to transport my carbon mtb's. I also have a heavier fatbike which now concerns me. Anyone try the Hidden Hitch or Drawtite? I'd hate to pass on a CX-3 based on this but it's a HUGE deciding factor. I just purchased the Thule for a number of reasons and don't want to use anything else.
I can only speak for whats on my cx3 and I have the hidden hitch with a kuat rack and I do not have a problem.I can't guarantee you won't have a problem but I just put pressure on my rack with no flex at all with the bikes on there is just a slight flex and on my last vehicle there was the same amount of flex.
E trailer installed my hitch so I know it was done right.
If you have any doubts I would get a different vehicle if I were you because the doubt is there on whether it's true or not but for peace of mind where you don't have to think about it.
 

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I'm a mechanical engineer and I agree with the other's assessments. That amount of flexing is bad juju. It would definitely give you some problems, up to and including damage to your car and/or bikes, in a short of amount of time. That is a pretty long lever arm cantilevered out there with up to 100+ pounds hanging on it which is generating a lot of torque. Class I hitches aren't meant to take the load hanging that far back from the receiver like you had with that bulky rack/tray thing.

Cantilevering the load out that far is going to effectively reduce the tongue weight rating. The Curt part has a tongue weight rating of 200 lbs normally, but extending your applied load that far back is going to cut that weight rating to 100 lbs or less. It's like putting a receiver extension on there which is not recommended by most hitch manufacturers for a Class I hitch.

Only way I could see that working reliably would be through some reinforcement to the hitch and likely the mounting points on the car. That would almost certainly involve welding and making the hitch a permanent fixture, which I assume is out of the question.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm a mechanical engineer and I agree with the other's assessments. That amount of flexing is bad juju. It would definitely give you some problems, up to and including damage to your car and/or bikes, in a short of amount of time. That is a pretty long lever arm cantilevered out there with up to 100+ pounds hanging on it which is generating a lot of torque. Class I hitches aren't meant to take the load hanging that far back from the receiver like you had with that bulky rack/tray thing.

Cantilevering the load out that far is going to effectively reduce the tongue weight rating. The Curt part has a tongue weight rating of 200 lbs normally, but extending your applied load that far back is going to cut that weight rating to 100 lbs or less. It's like putting a receiver extension on there which is not recommended by most hitch manufacturers for a Class I hitch.

Only way I could see that working reliably would be through some reinforcement to the hitch and likely the mounting points on the car. That would almost certainly involve welding and making the hitch a permanent fixture, which I assume is out of the question.
Yup - I agree 100%. The Thule T2 Pro sits pretty far off the back of the vehicle. I foresee future issues as the "Latest/Greatest' trend in hitch racks is wider bike spacing to accommodate the fact we are riding bars up to 800mm's wide these days. I contemplated the Yakima Dr. Tray, and while a few pounds lighter, it sits just as far off the back of the vehicle.

New Roof Racks arrived today. Problem solved essentially.

~TG
 

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Flex

I'm surprised you had this much flex. I've been using a thule bike hitch for over a year now and haven't had these issues. It's a different version then yours, and I use it for 2 road bikes which are a bit lighter but still. That amount of flex is definitely significant. Glad you were able to bring the setup back.

I've included a photo of my setup. I dont think my hitch extends out as far as yours does
 

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Wow, I don't get any flex in our Draw-Tite with my wife's road bike and my hybrid using our cheap Bell hitch rack.
 

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I am shooting in the dark here but who installed the OPs rack could that be the problem?Like I posted I don't get any kind of sway like that but The length of the rack could be the culprit.
 

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Wow, that's some serious movement.
I have a Curt, and using a Swagman G10 no issues like that at all, I do just for added peace of mind run a support strap to the rear hatch, and its very secure.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The length of the rack could be the culprit.
I think Playthru hits the nail on the head on this one. I have seen the car on the hoist at hitch city where it was installed. Top notch operation, and zero issues in how the hitch was installed. It all comes down to the mounting points and how much they can physically handle physics wise.

2 road bikes on an upright hitch rack, I don't think the system would even flinch. 2 bikes on an older style hitch with tight bike spacing, also likely not an issue. But the trend in new tray style hitch racks is going super wide, with adjustable trays that move left/right and fore/aft.

So running two modern trail bikes with 780mm bars, without interference, the outside bike sits 3 feet and change off the back bumper.

Anyways - Problem solved. 2 new Rockymounts Brass Knuckles, on Yakima skyline towers and jetstream bars.

~TG
 

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I think Playthru hits the nail on the head on this one. I have seen the car on the hoist at hitch city where it was installed. Top notch operation, and zero issues in how the hitch was installed. It all comes down to the mounting points and how much they can physically handle physics wise.

2 road bikes on an upright hitch rack, I don't think the system would even flinch. 2 bikes on an older style hitch with tight bike spacing, also likely not an issue. But the trend in new tray style hitch racks is going super wide, with adjustable trays that move left/right and fore/aft.

So running two modern trail bikes with 780mm bars, without interference, the outside bike sits 3 feet and change off the back bumper.

Anyways - Problem solved. 2 new Rockymounts Brass Knuckles, on Yakima skyline towers and jetstream bars.

~TG
Yeah, 3 feet is WAY too far back to support much weight on a hitch with a 200 lb tongue weight rating. That's a huge moment arm. I'd bet you're at maybe 1/3 of that rating left, maybe less, at that distance.
 

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Just remember

to install a good Lock for that style of Rack, thieves do not have to be too bright these days to know how to Remove or Undo a Quick Release Front Skewer/Axle and you will be left with just a Front Wheel for all your efforts in mounting via a Wheel Style Rack.

Just a thought
 

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I am shooting in the dark here but who installed the OPs rack could that be the problem?Like I posted I don't get any kind of sway like that but The length of the rack could be the culprit.
Hmmm, I would like to stick my head under that vehicle and just see if it looks fitted correctly. I’ve seen some diabolical work done by so called professionals.
 
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