Mazda CX-3 Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From the manual: Do not shift into N when driving the vehicle. Doing so can cause transaxle damage.
Is this an issue at low speeds? It's standard practice for me to shift from D to N as I'm slowing to a stop (red light).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Shouldn't be doing that, in an automatic. Unless you are going into park.
Auto boxes are not meant to be free wheeling in N with the engine on.

In a Manual it's a different story, not recommended, but can be done, due to manual clutch control etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
From the manual: Do not shift into N when driving the vehicle. Doing so can cause transaxle damage.
Is this an issue at low speeds? It's standard practice for me to shift from D to N as I'm slowing to a stop (red light).
I don't understand why you do this. If you leave it in drive the engine will actually assist wth braking. Even an automatic transmission will provide some drag to help when slowing to a stop. Without the added engine braking you are working your brakes harder to bring the car to a stop and this could result in reduced life of your brake components.

What would be better is using the paddle shifter to downshift as you are slowing to a stop. This is also helpful on long downhill sections where shifting to 5th, or even 4th gear can keep your speed from creeping up. I do this quite a bit and find it most useful where you know there are speed traps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to the above for your replies, but I'm afraid you've misunderstood the gist of my query. I'm not driving down the road at speed with my car in neutral. I'm only shifting into N in the last few feet before I stop, maybe 3 mph or less. If I know I'll be sitting for more that a few seconds I'm going to shift into N anyways. It seems less jarring than going from D to N while stopped with the engine at idle straining against the brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Still don't see a benefit of shifting to neutral while stopped. If I'm stopped for more than a few minutes, like at a rail crossing where the train is longer than I can see, I've been known to put it in Park and shut off the engine. For the length of time it takes at a traffic light I believe it's better to leave it in gear so that the RPM is lower. This should use less fuel than if the engine is allowed to freely rev higher like it does while in neutral, or park.

I would be inclined to follow the manufacturers instructions and not shift to neutral while the car is moving at any speed.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top