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I read the part about replacing all four tyres at once on AWD models too, and found it unbelievable that the car came with a can of gunk instead of space saver wheel.
As I understand it, if you use gunk, the tyre can't be repaired? so that would potentially mean replacing four 18" tyres for one puncture??

I made em gimme a spacesaver instead!
 

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The only time I have had a blowout was about three years ago with some old Dunlop snow tires on my Forester. Dunlop had discontinued that model the previous year and there were no old stock tires left in anyone's inventory so I had to replace them all. Not fun! I had to drive 30km on a major freeway with three good snow tires and the "compact spare" to get home. Because it was AWD, I had to disengage the fuse that controls the AWD system and convert the car to FWD for that trip. It really felt strange!
 

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Not 100% the thread for this, but it does relate to replacing/changing tires, but after the little mishap today, I had the opportunity to take the tires off, and I put spacers lying around in. I am wondering if anyone knows what the lug nut torque spec is. Is it similar to a Mazda3? Thats what I did, and it ran fine with no vibrations of any sort, but still want to be sure.

Shot of the spacer itself, with shot of what it looks like after. Not too too big of a difference (they were 5mm only) but it does make it more flush from the arch to top of wheel.
 

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my Owner's Manual 9-9

Lug nut tightening torque When installing a tire, tighten the lug nut to the following torque. 108—147 N·m (12—14 kgf·m, 80—108 ft·lbf)
 

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Ok, I went with 85 ft lbs, so Im good, thanks. Think im gonna open that manual of mine for once and give it a light read over.
 

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I've always been taught the 2/32" rule for tires on any drive axle for any vehicle. In other words, a FWD vehicle should never have tires with more than 2/32" difference in tread depth on the front axle, and a 4WD or AWD vehicle should never have any tire that has more than 2/32" of any other tire. In the FWD example the rear tires aren't as important because they are not part of the drivetrain. As others explained, the reasoning behind this is mostly to avoid unnecessary wear. Significant differences in tread depth can also cause the vehicle to pull to one side during acceleration and braking.
 

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Lug nut torque spec

Not 100% the thread for this, but it does relate to replacing/changing tires, but after the little mishap today, I had the opportunity to take the tires off, and I put spacers lying around in. I am wondering if anyone knows what the lug nut torque spec is. Is it similar to a Mazda3? Thats what I did, and it ran fine with no vibrations of any sort, but still want to be sure.

Shot of the spacer itself, with shot of what it looks like after. Not too too big of a difference (they were 5mm only) but it does make it more flush from the arch to top of wheel.
The spec is 80-108 ft-lbf (Shown in Vehicle Service Manual). I tighten my lugs at 100.
 

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What would happen if you had half worn out tires and needed to replace one. Could you have the worn tires run at a higher air pressure than the new one. Does anyone know what the formula is to figure out how much air pressure changes the number of rotations a tire goes through over a set distance. If we could figure this out it would be easy to equalize mismatched tires and make the differentials happy. I know this would give possible handling quirks, but we are already screwing up the handling by not replacing all the tires.
 

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I'm pretty sure they are not facts. I'm treating this lot as "fella down the bar says". Sorry but I don't believe a word of it. Isn't 2/32 similar to 1/16?
I agree! Never heard ANY of this before. I have owned several different AWD cars and now the CX3 this has never been explained to me... Common sense dictates the same SIZE tire on each wheel but then this applies to ALL cars... I am afraid I would need to be shown documentation to support the above comments.
 

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Stability control, TPMS, traction control, etc. might have some thing to do with this thing.

They all monitor wheel rotation speed.
 

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What would happen if you had half worn out tires and needed to replace one. Could you have the worn tires run at a higher air pressure than the new one. Does anyone know what the formula is to figure out how much air pressure changes the number of rotations a tire goes through over a set distance. If we could figure this out it would be easy to equalize mismatched tires and make the differentials happy. I know this would give possible handling quirks, but we are already screwing up the handling by not replacing all the tires.
I would absolutely not alter the tire pressure to create another rolling radius. That would almost certainly cause the vehicle to become unstable and possibly dangerous. I really wouldn’t be concerned about all this guff. OK, the text book rules say things have to be done in pairs but there is definitely a tolerance on all these speed sensing systems.

If a tire is more than half worn I would change the pair anyway but anything less and I would change one and have the odd pair at the back - only to prevent steering discrepancies.

IMHO.
 

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I don't know if anywhere still does it, but you used to be able to have some shops shave a tire down if you needed it at a certain size. No one likes paying for a new tire and then paying more to purposely shave some life off it in order to make it match the other worn tires. Some race shops still shave tires for race purposes, but I doubt they'd do it for street tires. Surely it would void any tire warranty on the new tire. Lots of negatives to doing this, for sure, but some might still prefer it to buying four new tires all at once because that can get quite expensive.

Edit: Apparently this practice is still alive and in use. Not sure how common it is, though, or how easy it is to find a shop that will do this kind of service.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAasIWzUJaU
 

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On my 2014 Frontier with 3/4 tire life left; I picked up a nail/spike that could not be repaired. No choice but to order a new tire, so ordered the same Goodrich rubber the truck came with OEM. This would leave me with 3 tires with 3/4 tread and one new one. I thought about it and realized my spare was full-size...! So I talked the shop into moving the spare off the steel rim onto the alloy and mount it on front with other new one. So now I have TWO new ones on the front and a 3/4 tread spare! I can live with that! The shop balked a bit but finally realized I would not order new tire UNLESS this was done. So they did it and no charge for mounting or balancing the spare... Got lucky there.
 

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New and late to this thread. Tires are built in a "box". A 215 can be as wide as 220 or as narrow a 210. This is a difference in sidewall height on a 50 series tire of 5mm(3/16"). Exceeds what others have said (2/23") can cause problems. Hence replaceing one tire with a different brand or style can create a problem with the all wheel drive system. The 50 series can vary also-another monkey wrench in tire diameter.
Advice from an old pro-check tires at least monthly-pressure and tread wear-there are no electronic alerts that will warn you. One pot hole can cause allignment issues and all tires lose air/nitrogen over time.
 

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Playing with air pressure is never a good idea. All diameter change happens in the sidewall-steel belts don't vary much. Low pressure creates sidewall heat-think Firestone on Ford Explores in the 90's exploding. High pressure creates poor handling-less contact patch.
Bite the bullet-get new tires and sell the others to fools looking to get cheep!
 

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I am NOT recommending this; just reporting what I did.
My wife's Sienna AWD came with run flats that picked up flats like magic and can't be repaired. They warned me I had to change all 4 tires, but I wasn't about to drop $1,000, so I only replaced the flat. She had 4 flats in 60,000 miles before I switched to regular tires and no flats in the next 60,000 miles. Despite doing it horribly wrong we had no problems (as in absolutely no repairs of any kind) in 120,000 miles.

I hope our Mazdas (cx9 and cx3) are as reliable.
 

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Something to consider with our CX-3's is that, according to Anchorman anyway, our drivetrains are only operating in AWD a small portion of the time under certain conditions and otherwise acts almost identically to a FWD setup with the exception being the CX-3 has the added rotating mass/inertia of the prop shaft that a FWD car doesn't have. Apparently these cars have the ability to fully disengage the drivetrain from the rear wheels, meaning no torque transmission at all to the rear wheels. This would mean that any center differential wear from unlike tire diameters front-to-rear should be very minimal. Seems the Mazda system we have is a clutch type setup. Most Subarus, in comparison, use a viscous-coupled center differential and cannot fully disengage the rear end. On those systems, they will always be in AWD mode to some extent and have some torque sent to the rear, possibly as little as 5%, but it's always there.
 

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Lug nut torque spec

The spec is 80-108 ft-lbf (Shown in Vehicle Service Manual). I tighten my lugs at 100.
I had a question on how to read these specs: Is the 80-108 ft-lbf (Shown in my 2017 Vehicle Service Manual) a range? As in I can set my torque wrench to anything higher than 80 ft-lbf and less than 108 ft-lbf? That seems odd to me since torque wrenches can be highly collaborated - anyone able to shed some light on this?
 

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It's just the service capacity of the lug studs and hubs. 80 ft.lbs is the minimum to keep the wheels on the car. 108 ft.lbs is the max to prevent damaging the car from repeated loosening/tightening cycles.
 
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It's just the service capacity of the lug studs and hubs. 80 ft.lbs is the minimum to keep the wheels on the car. 108 ft.lbs is the max to prevent damaging the car from repeated loosening/tightening cycles.
Thanks! I changed my four winter tires this weekend using the jack that comes with the car and a new torque wrench I purchased online. The lug nuts were previously put on by my mechanic using a impact wrench so they were screwed on way tighter than they should have been. When I put on my all season tiers, I set the torque wrench to 102 ft.lbs. and have not had any noticeable issues.
 
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